2017年12月21日

Fashion Weeks are outdated

The concept of ‘Fashion Weeks’ is an old and outdated format of doing business, according to the co-founder of Fashion Forward (FFWD), Ramzi Nakad, who said the Dubai-based designer platform will possibly let go of the imported event method and focus on integrating technology instead.


So far, the platform hosts bi-annual happenings that resemble fashion weeks, showcasing a series of runway shows by regional designers. But that is set to change, according to Nakad.


“The rise of digital communication and social media has sent the fashion industry into a complete overhaul, with immediacy and instant gratification becoming the name of the game,” he told Arabian Business in an exclusive interview.


Nakad said brands should think like tech companies about how consumers want to engage with them.


“There was a time when people looked to designers and platforms for the latest trends, but this is no longer the case. Today, consumers dictate what they want, and companies respond,” he said.


He added that FFWD will become consumer-centric rather than industry dependent by evolving the business into a fully integrated offline and online fashion platform versus its current physically limited bi-annual event “manifestation.”


“It will garner a regional and eventually international community of designers and consumers centered around emerging brands and sustainability, while enabling direct communication and sales channels between the designers and their customers by looking at models such as e-commerce and see-now-buy-now shows,” Nakad said.


International designers such as Tom Ford have taken to the new methods, including see-now-buy-now shows.


The Dubai government set a 2013 mandate to grow the city into an international hub by 2020. Since then, it launched several organisations such as the Dubai Design & Fashion Council (DDFC), Dubai Institute of Design and Innovation and Dubai Design District (d3), as well as endorsed privately-owned designer platform FFWD.Read more at:princess formal dresses | cheap formal dresses

  

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2017年12月18日

Luggage exhibit

As travel changed, so did luggage.


That's the story told by an elaborate exhibition about Louis Vuitton, the luxury luggage and fashion brand.


The exhibition, free to visit and on display in Lower Manhattan through Jan. 7, is called "Volez, Voguez, Voyagez," which means fly, sail, travel. It showcases the company's history, products and craftsmanship, demonstrating how designs changed with the evolution of travel. Luggage was designed first for transport by wagon, then for travel by sea, on trains, in cars and planes.


Trunks and bags are shown behind glass like works of art in a series of museum-like galleries. Lids open to reveal intricate compartments as if they were the contents of treasure chests. Included are cases and carriers designed for everything from toiletries to hats, from picnics to art supplies. Trunks with small drawers protected fragile objects; standing trunks had roll-out wardrobe racks so clothes could be hung, not folded. A plane is on display, along with a boat.


There's even a room where human artisans show how they cut leather and snip threads for luggage tags and handles, living proof of the craftsmanship behind the brand.


The company's history begins with Louis Vuitton himself. He started a trunk-making business in Paris in 1854 after leaving his village in eastern France and working for a box-maker. His designs were strong but light, distinguished by patterned motifs. The luggage has been a favorite of the rich and famous going back to Napoleon's wife Empress Eugenie, with later clients ranging from artist Henri Matisse to banker J.P. Morgan. The brand remains a favorite today among celebs from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood.


The location is in New York's financial district. But most visitors will likely lack the means to buy Vuitton products, which can run in the thousands of dollars. Still, attention-getting temporary displays like this are becoming a standard way for brands to tell their story.


"Many of these brands pop something up, draw a big audience, get some publicity, get reporters to talk about it," said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. "You don't need to be there 12 months a year. You just need to establish a little publicity and move on."


Chiagouris says this type of showcase can also be far more effective than a traditional ad campaign. "Ads are very fleeting and don't generate the kind of independent interaction with a brand the way an exhibit would," he said. A show like this "takes something that has almost become wallpaper and suddenly puts it into your current mindset and consciousness."


Exhibitions also give designers the space and flexibility to fine-tune their message. In this case, the subdued, museumlike atmosphere creates a "mood that reflects the brand, somewhat elegant and somewhat understated," he said.


If You Go.Read more at:evening dresses | formal dress shops

  

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2017年12月05日

Announcing Reem Acra

This week, we are pleased to introduce four partners on BoF Careers.


Reem Acra rose to fame in the 1990s for the eponymous designer's intricately detailed bridal wear, expanding the offering to ready-to-wear in 2001. Delicate embroidery, ornate beading and feminine designs have attracted a strong celebrity clientele and stockists including Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. The label is now hiring an account executive in New York.


Founded in 1992, Dice Kayek is a contemporary couture label based in Paris. Inspired by the founders Ece and Ayse Ege's Turkish heritage, the brand is characterised by architectural silhouettes, attention to detail and craftsmanship. Now stocked in 45 countries and with over 100 stockists, Dice Kayek is currently looking for a commercial manager in Paris.


With a playful approach to modern jewellery, Roxanne Assoulin is an emerging New York-based label on the rise. "Uncomplicated Indulgence" characterises the brands collectable stacks of candy-coloured chokers and bracelets, designs that have garnered a strong social media following. Based in New York, Roxanne Assoulin is seeking a public relations coordinator and a web director.Read more at:formal dresses online | bridesmaid dresses online

  

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2017年12月05日

Announcing Reem Acra

This week, we are pleased to introduce four partners on BoF Careers.


Reem Acra rose to fame in the 1990s for the eponymous designer's intricately detailed bridal wear, expanding the offering to ready-to-wear in 2001. Delicate embroidery, ornate beading and feminine designs have attracted a strong celebrity clientele and stockists including Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. The label is now hiring an account executive in New York.


Founded in 1992, Dice Kayek is a contemporary couture label based in Paris. Inspired by the founders Ece and Ayse Ege's Turkish heritage, the brand is characterised by architectural silhouettes, attention to detail and craftsmanship. Now stocked in 45 countries and with over 100 stockists, Dice Kayek is currently looking for a commercial manager in Paris.


With a playful approach to modern jewellery, Roxanne Assoulin is an emerging New York-based label on the rise. "Uncomplicated Indulgence" characterises the brands collectable stacks of candy-coloured chokers and bracelets, designs that have garnered a strong social media following. Based in New York, Roxanne Assoulin is seeking a public relations coordinator and a web director.Read more at:formal dresses online | bridesmaid dresses online

  

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2017年12月01日

Rihanna only sleeps

She shared: "I have a lot of trouble switching off. Even when I get home early, which means before 1am, I start binge-watching shows or documentaries, which I love.


"I can't go straight to bed. As a matter of fact, I only sleep three or four hours a night."


The 'Diamonds' singer regards the likes of Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey and Tina Turner to be among the biggest inspirations in her own life.


But perhaps surprisingly, Rihanna has also taken inspiration from the late Princess Diana - and in particular, the so-called revenge dress she wore to the Serpentine Gallery's summer party in 1994, shortly after it emerged Prince Charles had been unfaithful to her.


The fashion-conscious star told French Vogue magazine: "Every time a man cheats on you or treats you badly, you need a revenge dress. Every woman knows that.


"But whether her choice of this knockdown dress was conscious or not, I am touched by the idea that even Princess Diana could suffer like any ordinary woman. This Diana Bad B***h moment blew me away."


Meanwhile, Rihanna previously admitted that her fashion sense was hugely influenced by her male friends.


The 'Work' hitmaker recalled: "When I was 13 or 14, I didn't want to wear what my mom wanted me to wear. I was very much a boy in my style, my demeanour.


"All my friends were guys. I loved things that boys did. I loved being easy with my clothes. I loved wearing hats and scarves and snapbacks on my head. It was my way of rebelling. I wanted to dress like my brother.


"After a while, it was just easier for Mom to dress us both the same. We wore the same jeans, the same T-shirts."Read more at:australian formal dresses | evening wear

  

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